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make a suit of clothes for myself. I hope it will not be a great while, before it will be unfashionable for a gentleman to appear in any other dress.

Indeed we have already been too long subject to British prejudices.

I use no porter or cheese in my family, but such as is made in America. Both those articles may now be purchased, of an excellent quality.

1789.

The promotion of Domestic Manufactures will, in my conception, be among the first consequences which may naturally be expected to flow from an energetic government.

For myself, having an equal regard for the prosperity of the farming, trading, and manufacturing interests, I will only observe, that I cannot conceive the extension of the latter, (so far as it may afford employment to a great number of hands, which would be otherwise, in a manner, idle,) can be detrimental to the former.

MANUFACTURES AND THE ARTS.

*

Captain Barney has just arrived here, in a miniature ship† called The Federalist, and has done me the honor to offer that beautiful curiosity, as a present to

*Mount Vernon.

Fifteen feet in length, rigged and equipped as a ship.

me, on your part. I pray you to accept the warmest expressions of my sensibility, for this specimen of American ingenuity, in which the exactitude of the proportions, the neatness of the workmanship, and the elegance of the decorations, which make your present fit to be preserved in a Cabinet of Curiosities, at the same time that they exhibit the skill and taste of the artists, demonstrate, that Americans are not inferior to any people whatever, in the use of mechanical instruments, and the art of ship-building.

1788.

NATIONAL ENCOURAGEMENT OF MANUFACTURES.

Congress have repeatedly, and not without success, directed their attention to the encouragement of Manufactures. The object is of too much importance, not to insure a continuance of their efforts, in every way which shall appear eligible.

* William Smith and others, of the city of Baltimore.

1796.

8. MAILS, ROADS, AND INLAND NAVIGATION.

POST OFFICE.

I cannot forbear intimating the expediency of facilitating the intercourse between the distant parts of the country, by a due attention to the Post-Office and PostRoads.

CIRCULATION OF POLITICAL INTELLIGENCE.

It is represented, that some provisions of the law which establishes the Post-Office, operate, in experiment, against the transmission of newspapers to distant parts of the country. Should this, upon due inquiry, be found to be the fact, a full conviction of the importance of facilitating the circulation of political intelligence and information will, I doubt not, lead to the application of a remedy.

1792.

PUBLIC ROADS.

It has been understood, by wise politicians and enlightened patriots, that giving a facility to the means of travelling, for strangers, and of intercourse, for citi

zens, was an object of legislative concern, and a circumstance highly beneficial to the country.

1788.

NATIONAL INFLUENCE OF MAILS AND ROADS.

The importance of the Post-Office and Post-Roads, on a plan sufficiently liberal and comprehensive, as they respect the expedition, safety, and facility of communication, is increased, by their instrumentality in diffusing a knowledge of the laws and proceedings of the Government, which, while it contributes to the security of the people, serves also to guard them against the effects of misrepresentation and misconception.

1791.

INLAND NAVIGATION.

It gives me great pleasure, to find a spirit for Inland Navigation prevailing so generally.

No country is more capable of improvements in this way, than our own; none will be more benefited; and to begin well is all in all.

1786.

THE LAKES.

I am glad to hear, that the vessels for the Lakes are going on with such industry. Maintaining the superiority over the water, is certainly of infinite impor

tance. I trust, neither courage nor activity will be wanting in those to whom the business is committed.

1776.

NAVIGATION OF THE LAKES.

I shall be mistaken, if they do not build vessels for the navigation of the lakes, which will supersede the necessity of coasting on either side.

*The New Yorkers.

1784.

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