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PALLIATING FAULTS.

I shall never attempt to palliate my own foibles, by exposing the error of another.

INGRATITUDE.

Nothing is more a stranger to my breast, or a sin that my soul more abhors, than that black and detestable one, of ingratitude.

Ingratitude, I hope, will never constitute a part of my character, nor find a place in my bosom.

PROMISES.

I never wish to promise more, than I have a moral certainty of performing.

SECRECY AND DESPATCH.

Secrecy and despatch may prove the soul of suc

cess to an enterprise.

AGREEMENTS.

Loose agreements are seldom rewarded, to the mutual satisfaction of both parties.

PRIVATE VIRTUES, AND MILITARY GLORY.

The private virtues of economy, prudence, and industry, are not less amiable, in civil life, than the more splendid qualities of valor, perseverance, and enterprise, in public life.

THE PASSIONS.

The various passions and motives, by which men. are influenced, are concomitants of fallibility, and ingrafted into our nature.

CONSCIENCE.

Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark

of celestial fire, called Conscience.

BIDING THE TIME.

Time may unfold more, than prudence ought to disclose.

MORAL CHARACTER.

A good moral character is the first essential in a
It is therefore highly important, to endeavor

man.

not only to be learned, but virtuous.

II. APPROBATION AND CENSURE.

Enemies he had, but they were few, and chiefly of the same family with the man, who could not bear to hear Aristides always called the just. Among them all I have never heard of one who charged him with any habitual vice, or even foible. DAVID RAMSAY, M. D., Jan. 15, 1800.

I cannot, indeed, help admiring the wisdom and fortune of this great man. By the phrase "fortune," I mean not in the smallest degree to derogate from his merit. But, notwithstanding his extraordinary talents and exalted integrity, it must be considered as singularly fortunate, that he should have experienced a lot, which so seldom falls to the portion of humanity, and have passed through such a variety of scenes, without stain and without reproach.

It must, indeed, create astonishment, that, placed in circumstances so critical, and filling for a series of years a station so conspicuous, his character should never once have been called in question; that he should in no one instance have been accused either of improper insolence, or of mean submission, in his transactions with foreign nations.

For him it has been reserved, to run the race of glory, without experiencing the smallest interruption to the brilliancy of his career.

CHARLES FOX, British Parliament, Jan. 31, 1794

APPROBATION OF THE WISE AND GOOD.

Nothing in human life can afford a liberal mind more rational and exquisite satisfaction, than the approbation of a wise, a great, and a virtuous man.

REPUTATION.

The good opinion of honest men, friends to freedom, and well-wishers to mankind, wherever they may be born or happen to reside, is the only kind of reputation a wise man would ever desire.

POPULAR FAVOR.

The account which you have given of the sentiments of the people respecting my conduct, is extremely flattering. Pray God I may continue to deserve them, in the perplexed and intricate situation I stand in.

1775.

To stand well in the estimation of one's country, is a happiness that no rational creature can be insensible of.

DESERT, DISTINGUISHED FROM SUCCESS.

The thinking part of mankind do not form their judgment from events; and their equity will ever attach equal glory, to those actions which deserve success, and those which have been crowned with it.

* General Joseph Reed.

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