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Our citizen-soldiers have impressed a useful lesson of patriotism on mankind.

UNIVERSAL SYMPATHY.

The voice of mankind is with me.

Happy, thrice happy shall they be pronounced, .. who have assisted in protecting THE RIGHTS OF HUMAN NATURE, and establishing AN ASYLUM FOR THE POOR

AND OPPRESSED OF ALL NATIONS AND RELIGIONS.

My policy has been, to cultivate PEACE WITH

ALL THE WORLD.

For me to express my sentiments, with respect to the administration of the concerns of another government, might incur a charge of stepping beyond the line of prudence. But the principles of humanity will justify an avowal of my regret, and I do regret exceedingly, that any causes whatever should have produced and continued until this time a war, more bloody, more expensive, more calamitous, and more pregnant with events, than modern or perhaps any other times can furnish an example of. And I most sincerely and devoutly wish, that the exertions of those having this object in view, may effect what HUMAN NATURE cries aloud for,-a GENERAL PEACE.

THE CAUSE OF SUFFERING HUMANITY.

I observe with singular satisfaction, the cases in which your benevolent institution has been instrumental, in recalling some of our fellow-creatures, as it were, from beyond the gates of eternity, and has given occasion for the hearts of parents and friends to leap for joy.

The provision made for the preservation of shipwrecked mariners, is also highly estimable, in the view of every philanthropic mind, and greatly consolatory to that suffering part of the community. These things will draw upon you the blessings of those who were nigh to perish.

These works of charity and good will towards men reflect, in my estimation, great lustre upon the authors, and presage an era of still further improve

ments.

How pitiful, in the eye of reason and religion, is that false ambition, which desolates the world with fire and sword, for the purposes of conquest and fame, when compared to the milder virtues of making our neighbors and our fellow-men as happy as their frail condition and perishable nature will permit them to be!

*The Massachusetts Humane Society.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF MAN.

As the member of an infant empire, as a philanthropist by character, and, if I may be allowed the expression, as a citizen of the Great Republic of Humanity at large, I cannot help turning my attention, sometimes, to this subject.

I would be understood to mean, I cannot avoid reflecting, with pleasure, on the probable influence that commerce may hereafter have on human manners, and society in general.

On these occasions I consider, how mankind may be connected, like ONE GREAT FAMILY, in fraternal ties.

I indulge a fond, perhaps an enthusiastic idea, that, as the world is evidently much less barbarous than it has been, its melioration must still be progressive; that nations are becoming more humanized in their policy; that the subjects of ambition and causes for hostility are daily diminishing; and, in fine, that the period is not very remote, when the benefits of a liberal and free commerce will pretty generally succeed to the devastations and horrors of

war.

1786.

V. DEATH.

I. MORTALITY AND BEREAVEMENT.

May the crown of universal love and gratitude, of universal admiration, and of the universal reverence and honor of thy saved country, rest and flourish upon the head of its Veteran General, and Glorious Defender; until, by the divine Jesus whom thou hast loved and adored, and of whose holy religion thou art not ashamed, thou shalt be translated from a world of war, to a world of peace, liberty, and eternal triumph.

EZRA STILES, D. D., LL. D., Pres. of Yale College, 1753.

Our hero was the same in that moment, as in all the past,-magnanimous, firm, confiding in the mercy, resigned to the will, of Heaven.

SAMUEL STANHOPE SMITH, D. D., Pres. of Coll. of New-Jersey.

BEREAVEMENT.

I am extremely sorry for the the death of Mrs. Putnam, and sympathize with you on the occasion.

Remembering, that all must die, and that she had lived to an honorable age, I hope you will bear the misfortune, with that fortitude and complacency of mind, that become a man and a Christian.

*General Putnam.

1777.

MOURNING.

The ties of nature must have their yearnings, before calm resignation will preponderate.

1787.

DEATH OF SEVERAL REVOLUTIONARY WORTHIES.

Thus, some of the pillars of the Revolution fall. Others are mouldering, by insensible degrees.

May our country never want props, to support the glorious fabric.

1786.

CHRISTIAN FORTITUDE.

Time alone can blunt the keen edge of afflictions.

Philosophy and our Religion hold out to us such hopes as will, upon proper reflection, enable us to bear, with fortitude, the most calamitous incidents of life; and this is all that can be expected from the feelings of humanity.

1788.

RESIGNATION.

It is not for man, to scan the wisdom of Provi

dence.

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