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my power and to the best of my abilities, all orders of Congress, with a scrupulous exactness.

Connecticut wants no Massachusetts man in her corps. Massachusetts thinks there is no necessity for a Rhode-Islander to be introduced amongst them; and New Hampshire says, it is very hard that her valuable and experienced officers, (who are willing to serve,) should be discarded, because her own regiments under the new establishment cannot provide for them.

1775.

It is a maxim with me, that, in times of imminent danger to the country, every true patriot should occupy the post in which he can render his services most effectually.

1799.

BRAVERY.

I have a constitution hardy enough to encounter and undergo the most severe trials; and, I flatter myself, resolution to face what any man dares, as shall be proved when it comes to the test.

1754.

HONOR.

The rank of office, to me, is much more important than the pay.

You make mention of my continuing in the service, and retaining my Colonel's commission. This idea has filled me with surprise; for, if you think me capable of holding a commission that has neither rank nor emolument annexed to it, you must entertain a very contemptible opinion of my weakness, and believe me to be more empty than the commission itself. 1754.

THE PATRIOT'S OFFERING.

It is my full intention, to devote my life and fortune, in the cause we are engaged in, if needful.

1775.

The principles by which my conduct has been actuated through life, would not suffer me, in any great emergency, to withhold any services I could render, required by my country; especially in a case, where its dearest rights are assailed by lawless ambition and intoxicated power, contrary to every principle of justice, and in violation of solemn compacts and laws, which govern all civilized nations; and this, too, with the obvious intent to sow thick the seeds of disunion, for the purpose of subjugating the government, and destroying our independence and happiness.

1798.

* Colonel William Fitzhugh asked him to become a Captain of the Virginia Independent Company, but to retain his Colonelcy.

CONSCIOUS RECTITUDE.

The consciousness of having attempted faithfully to discharge my duty, and the approbation of my country, will be a sufficient recompense for my services.

1783.

Conscious, that it is the aim of my actions to promote the public good, and that no part of my conduct is influenced by personal enmity to individuals, I cannot be insensible to the artifices, employed by some men, to prejudice me in the public esteem.

1779.

SACRIFICES TO PRINCIPLE.

I believe, or at least I hope, that there is public virtue enough left among us, to deny ourselves every thing but the bare necessaries of life, to accomplish our end.

To share the common lot, and participate the inconveniences which the army, from the peculiarity of our circumstances, are obliged to undergo, has, with me, been a fundamental principle.

1789.

ENDURANCE.

We should never despair. Our situation has before been unpromising, and has changed for the better; so,

I trust, it will again. If new difficulties arise, we must only put forth new exertions, and proportion our efforts to the exigency of the times.

1777.

The value of liberty was enhanced in our estimation, by the difficulty of its attainment; and the worth of characters appreciated, by the trial of adversity.

1790.

THE SACRIFICES AND REWARDS OF PATRIOTISM.

It is but justice, to assign great merit to the temper of those citizens whose estates were more immediately the scene of warfare. Their personal services were rendered, without constraint; and the derangement of their affairs submitted to, without dissatisfaction. It was the triumph of patriotism over personal considerations. And our present enjoyments of peace and freedom reward the sacrifice.

1789.

THE PATRIOT'S TWO-FOLD DEPENDENCE.

I have ever thought, and am still of opinion, that no terms of accommodation will be offered by the British ministry, but such as cannot be accepted by America. We have nothing to depend upon, but the protection of a kind Providence, and unanimity among ourselves.

SELF-CONTROL.

It is our duty, to make the best of our misfortunes, and not suffer passion to interfere with our interest and the public good.

UNYIELDING PURPOSE.

We will retreat beyond the Susquehanna river, and thence, if necessary, to the Alleghany mountains.

1777.

THE PATRIOT'S GREAT OBJECT.

The welfare of the country, is the great object to which our cares and efforts ought to be directed.

I shall derive great satisfaction from a co-operation in the pleasing, though arduous task, of insuring to our fellow-citizens the blessings which they have a right to expect from a free, efficient, and equal govern

ment.

TALENTS, RECTITUDE, PATRIOTISM.

In these honorable qualifications, I behold the surest pledges, that, as, on one side, no local prejudices

* He had been asked what could be done, if the enemy continued to advance.

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