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self, I could despise all the party clamor, and unjust censure, which might be expected from some, whose personal enmity might be occasioned by their hostility to the Government.

CENSURE AND DUTY.

I am resolved, that no misrepresentations, falsehoods, or calumny, shall make me swerve from what I conceive to be the strict line of duty.

1795.

MEN MUST BE TOUCHED, TO BE MOved.

Unfortunately, the nature of man is such, that the experience of others is not attended to as it ought to be.

We must feel, ourselves, before we can think, or perceive the danger that threatens us.

UNAVAILING COMPLAINTS, AND PRESENT DUTY.

We ought not to look back, unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors, and for the purpose of profiting by dear-bought experience.

To inveigh against things that are past and irremediable, is unpleasing; but to steer clear of the shelves and rocks we have struck upon, is the part of

wisdom, equally as incumbent on political as other men, who have their own little bark, or that of others, to navigate through the intricate paths of life, or the trackless ocean, to the haven of security and rest.

1781.

SENSIBILITY TO PUBLIC APPROBATION.

For having performed duties, which I conceive every country has a right to require of its citizens, I claim no merit; but no man can feel, more sensibly, the reward of approbation for such services than I do.

APPEAL TO THE ARCHIVES.

I appeal to the Archives of Congress, and call on those sacred deposits to witness for me.

1783.

III. INTEMPERANCE AND GAMING.

They were offensive to his sense of moral and religious propriety, and therefore discouraged, from principle, through every period of his life.

E. C. M'GUIRE, D. D.

On no occasion is there the least authority for supposing he ever transcended the bounds of moderation in the enjoyments of life, or the indulgence of those passions universally implanted in the nature of man. He consequently escaped all the delusions of excess, which consist in false, misty, and exaggerated views or designs, stimulated into action by artificial excitement, aud misleading the judgment, while they aggravate the passions and madden imagination.

Thus, his intellect was always clear, and the admirable physical powers bestowed upon him by nature were never debased to bad purposes, or weakened by licentious indulgence. JAMES K. PAULDING.

USE OF WINES AND SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS.

My chief reason for supposing the West India trade detrimental to us, was, that rum, the principal article received from thence, is the bane of morals, and the parent of idleness.

I could wish to see the direct commerce with France encouraged, to the greatest degree; and that

almost all the foreign spirits which we consume, should consist of the wines and brandies made in that country. The use of these liquors would, at least, be more innocent to the health and morals of the people, than the thousands of hogsheads of poisonous rum, which are annually consumed in the United States.

1788.

IMMORALITY, DISCOUNTENANCED.

This, I am certain of, and can call my conscience, and, what I suppose will be a still more demonstrative proof in the eyes of the world, my Orders, to witness, how much I have, both by threats and persuasive means, endeavored to discountenance gaming, drinking, swearing, and irregularities of every other kind; while I have, on the other hand, practised every artifice, to inspire a laudable emulation, in the officers, for the service of their country, and to encourage the soldiers, in the unerring exercise of their duty.

1756.

TIPPLING-HOUSES.

I apprehend, it will be thought advisable, to keep a garrison always at Fort Loudoun; for which reason, I would beg to represent the number of tippling-houses in Winchester, as a great nuisance to the soldiers, who, by this means, in despite of the utmost care and

vigilance, are, so long as their pay holds out, incessantly drunk, and unfit for service.

1756.

PROFANITY AND DRUNKENNESS.

The General most earnestly requires and expects a due observance of those articles of war, established for the government of the army, which forbid profane cursing, swearing, and drunkenness.

1776.

GAMES OF CHANCE.

All officers, con-commissioned officers, and soldiers, are positively forbid playing at cards, or other games of chance. At this time of public distress, men may find enough to do, in the service of their God and their country, without abandoning themselves to vice and immorality.

1776.

Gaming, of every kind, is expressly forbidden, as being the foundation of evil, and the cause of many a brave and gallant officer's ruin. Games of exercise, for amusement, may not only be permitted, but encouraged.

1777.

Avoid gaming. This is a vice which is productive of every possible evil; equally injurious to the morals and health of its votaries.

1783.

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