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Feb. 22.
Apr. 12.

His birth, in Westmoreland county, Virginia.
Death of his father, at the age of 49 years.
His brother Lawrence obtained for him a mid-
shipman's warrant, in the British navy.
Mar... Surveyor of Lord Fairfax's lands on the Potomac

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river.

Military Inspector, with the rank of Major, to protect the frontiers of Virginia against the Frenen and Indians.

He sailed for Barbadoes, with his brother Law

rence.

Adjutant General.

Commissioner to the French on the Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel, for the defence of the colony of Virginia.

Aid-de-camp to General Braddock, at the battle
of Monongahela.

Commander-in-chief of the Virginia forces.
He resigned his commission.

His marriage. Member of the Virginia House of
Burgesses.

Commissioner for settling the military accounts of
the colony.

His tour to the Ohio and Great Kenawha rivers,
Member of the Virginia Conventions, on the points
at issue between Great Britain and the Colonies.
Member of the first Continental Congress,
Member of the second Continental Congress.
Commander-in-chief.

Commander of the army at Cambridge.
Boston evacuated by the British army.
Declaration of American Independence.
Battle of Long Island.

Battle of Trenton.

Congress invested him with dictatorial powers.
Battle of Princeton.

Battle of the Brandywine.

Battle of Germantown.

HIS

YEARS.

AGE.

EVENTS.

Arnold's treason.

Mutiny of the Pennsylvania troops.

Surrender of Yorktown and Gloucester.
Peace proclaimed to the army.

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July 16.

Stony Point taken.

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Apr. 19.

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Nov. 2.

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Nov. 25.

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Dec. 28.

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His farewell to the army.

New York evacuated by the British army.
He resigned his commission.

His tour to the Western Country.

May 14. Delegate to the General Convention at Philadel

phia, to form a Constitution.
Convention.

President of the United States.

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1791

1793

1798

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57

Apr. 30.

His inauguration, at New York.

Aug. 25.

Death of his mother, at the age of 82 years.
His tour through the Eastern States.

Mar. 4.

64

65

July 8.

67

Dec. 14.

His tour through the Southern States.

President, for a second term.

M. Genet, Minister from France to the United
States.

Sept. 17. His Farewell Address to the people of the United

States.

He retired to private life. Difficulties with France.
Preparations for war.

Commander-in-chief of the Armies of the United

States.

His death, at Mount Vernon.

INDEX.

A.

Abbey, Dryburgh, 338.

CONTRACTION: W., for Washington.

Abolition of slavery, see Slavery.
Academy, Military, 228. Of Arts and Sci-
ences, American, 230. Liberty Hall, 395.
Alexandria, 394.

Accommodation, Spirit of, 63.
Acquaintances, shaking off, 245
Actions, not words, 240.

Adams, John, President; his tributes to
W., 16.

Address, Inaugural, of W., 355.
Adversity, Friendship in, 242. Its salu.
tary effect, 27.
Advice, friendly, 239.

Aged, infirm, and infant slaves, 259.
Fund for them, 261.

Agents, Indian, 207.

Agreeable recollections, 302.
Agreements, 313.
Agriculture, 83, 132.

Its importance,
129. Proper cultivation of lands, 130.
Speculation and agriculture, 131. The
husbandman, 180. Societies, 129. War
and agriculture, 131.
Alexander, the Great, 396.
Alexandria, in Virginia, 242. Academy
at, 394.

Alliances, Foreign, 91. Permanent Na-
tional, 92.

Ally, excessive confidence in, 218.
America. And Europe, 84. See Colo-
nies, American.

American. The common name of all
citizens of the United States, 47, 166,
169. Academy of Arts and Sciences,
230. Character, 95. Commerce, 219.
Flag, 219. Independence, 409. Mu-
seum, a periodical, 232. National Pre-
dilections, 191. Revolution, its influ-
ence in Europe, 27. Revolution, see
Revolution, American.

Americans. Their influence on other na-
tions, 25. United in name, sympathy
and interest, 47.

Ames, Fisher. His tributes to W., 267,
306.

Amity, and concession, 247.
Anarchy, and tyranny, 20.

André, Major John, 251. His tribute to
W., 334.

Antidote to slanders, 320.

Antipathies, national, 98.

Appeal to the archives of Congress, 328.
Approbation. Public, 328. Of the wise
and good, 315.
Arbitrary power, 20.
Archives, appeal to, 328.
Aristides, 315.
Aristocracy, 78.
Armies, God of, 349.

Of the United

States, their character and sufferings, 40.
Arming slaves, 195.
Armorial devices, 23.

Arms, and accoutrements, of the Patriot
Army, 178.

Army. Agents of civil power, 152. A

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band of brothers, 168. Character and
sufferings of, 174, 175. Of the Consti-
tution, 163. Evils of rum in the, 332.
Farewell to, by W., 288. Foreign offi
cers in, 187, 188. Importance of order
and harmony in, 165, 168. Patriot, and
their arms and accoutrements, 175, 176,
178. People and the army, 170. Of
the Revolution, 151 ss. How distin-
guished from a mob, 171. Standing,
179, 180. Temporary, 182., Towns, and
the army, 170.
Arnold, Benedict, 250. Expedition to
Quebec, 875. Treason, 811, 410. Trib-
ute to W. 334. Mrs. Arnold, 334.
Arts, Importance of the, 230. And Man-
ufactures, 137. National interest of the,
229. American Academy of the, 280.
Asgill. Captain, 252-255.

Asia, Literature of, 219.
Attachments, national, 93, 94,
Attack, often the best defence, 224.
Author of all good, 367. Of the Gospel,

842.

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B.

C.

Bailey, Philip James, 396.

Baltimore, 138.

Cadwallader, General John, 306.
Calm views of death, 404.
Calumny, the best answer to, 323.

Bancroft, Rev. Aaron, his tribute to W., Calvert, Benedict, 297. His daughter,

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Candor, national, 111.
Canton, 219.

Cares of life, 402.
Carey, Matthew, 282.
Carleton, Guy, 214.

Carlisle, Lord, 263, 265.
Carroll, Archbishop, 388.
Carthage, 396.

Catharine the Second, of Russia, 389.
Cato, the Censor, 248.

Cause of the oppressed, 396.
Cavillers, 326.

Censure. Gratuitons, 321. The shadow
of merit, 326. Duty and censure, 327.
Unjust, to be despised, 326.
Ceremony, 325.

Chancellorship of William and Mary
College, 231.

Channing, Rev. Wm. E., his tribute to
W., 234, 238.
Chaplains, 377 ss.

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Civility, ceremonious, 325.

Clock, the political system of the United
States compared to a, 39.
Coat-armor, 22.
Coinage, 127.

College. Education, 231. New Jersey,
393, 400. William and Mary, 231.
Colonies, American. The cause of, 26.
Will not submit to the loss of their
rights, 25. Baffled Great Britain for
eight years, 26. Interest of their con-
test, 27. Mr. Pitt and Lord Camden,
their patrons, 142. Policy of Great
Britain, in relation to, 29. British Com-
missioners to treat with, 29. Favorable
disposition of Spain, 38. Promised suc-
cor from France, 38. Distress of their
armies, 26. Pecuniary distress, 146.
Non-importation of British commodi-
ties, 145-147. Not hushed by the rod
of Great Britain, 26. Contest for hon-
orable peace, 37.

Colton, C. C., his remarks on Christian
charities, 890.
Columbia, 267.

Commander-in-chief, his body-guard,

192.

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Commercial System, of the United
States, 134.

Common Sense, and common honesty
309.

Common Weal, 88.

Company, 244. Choice of, 245.
Companies, in the British army, 185.
Compassion, for man and beast, 248.
Compensation, pecuniary, refused by
W., 255.

Complaints, unavailing, 327.
Composure, in sickness, 403.
Comprehensive benevolence, 266.
Concession, 247.

Confederation, Articles of, 45.
Confidence, public, 71.

Congress. Character of, 73. Armorial
devices of, 23. Prerogatives of, 44, 60, 61.
Obedience to, 271. Employs Indians,
in war, 212. Too many able men with-
drawn from, 39. Military influence of,
150. State jealousies, 62. In conflict
with local politics, 65. Choice of dele-
gates, 67. Annual sessions, 68. Al-
lows Chaplains, 378. Continental, 409.
Robert Burns' opinion of, 142. W.'s
farewell to, 289. Releases Capt. Asgill,
254.

Conjugal affection, 292.
Connecticut, 272.
Connubial life, 299.

Conquest of Canaan, a poem dedicated
to W., 231.
Conscience, 313.

Dictates of, 319. Our
guide, 19. Rights of, 375.
Conscientious Scruples, 374.
Conscious Rectitude, 274, 318.
Consolation, Christian, 493.
Constitution, of the United States, 43 ss.
Changes in, 77. Our guide, 73. The
people's choice, 71. Fears of its pro-
ducing aristocracy, or monarchy, 22.
Its principles, incompatible with no-
bility and knighthood, 22. To be vin-
dicated, 64. Its danger, from innova-
tion, 54; and from party spirit, 55.
Unanimity of its adoption, 64. The
Constitution or disunion, 64. Combi-
nations against it, in Pennsylvania, 161.
The "Army of the Constitution," 168.
Continental Congress, 409.
Convenience. And duty, 310. And
friendship, 310.

Convention, English, in 1688, 142.
Conversation, imprudent, of officers in
the army, 160.

Conway, General Thomas. His tribute
to W., 306.

Cooper, J. Fenimore, 208.
Corn-house, filled for the poor, 390.
Cornwallis, Lord, his surrender of York-
town and Gloucester, 351, 383.
Corporal punishment, 164, 165.

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