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FRIENDSHIP IN ADVERSITY.

My friendship, so far from being diminished, has misfortunes.

increased in the ratio of his

1796.

RENEWAL OF FRIENDSHIP'S COVENANT.

The friendship I have conceived, will not be impaired by absence; but it may be no unpleasing circumstance to brighten the chain, by a renewal of the

covenant.

PERSONAL FRIENDSHIP AND POLITICAL DISAGREEMENT.

The friendship which I ever professed and felt for you, met with no diminution, from the difference of our political sentiments.

I know the rectitude of my own intentions; and, believing in the sincerity of yours, lamented, though I did not condemn your renunciation of the creed I had adopted.

Nor do I think any person or power ought to do it,

*Lafayette, imprisoned at Olmütz.

The Rev. Bryan Fairfax, an Episcopalian clergyman, of Alexandria, Virginia. He afterward became the eighth and last Lord Fairfax.

whilst your conduct is not opposed to the general interest of the people, and the measures they are pursuing.

Our actions, depending upon ourselves, may be controlled, while the powers of thinking, originating in higher causes, cannot always be moulded to our wishes.

1778.

II. BENEVOLENCE.

Amid all the tumult of the camp, and all the excesses inseparable from civil war, humanity took refuge under his tent, and never was repelled from it. In triumphs and in adversity, he was ever tranquil as wisdom, and simple as virtue. The gentle affections abode in the depths of his heart, even in those moments when the claims of his own cause seemed to sanction in a manner the laws of vengeance.

M. FONTANES.

Thero was a gravity and reserve, indeed, in his countenance and deportment, partly natural, and partly the effect of habitual cares for the public weal; but theso were wholly unmixed with the least austerity or moroseness.

True nativo dignity was happily blended with the most placid mildness and condescension. J. M. SEWALL, Portsmouth, N. H. Dec. 31, 1799.

SOCIAL COURTESY.

Be courteous to all, but intimate with few; and let those few be well tried, before you give them your confidence.

Every action in company, ought to be with some sign of respect to those present.

COMPANY.

The company in which you will improve most, will be least expensive to you.

SHAKING OFF ACQUAINTANCES.

It is easy to make acquaintances, but difficult to shake them off, however irksome and unprofitable they are found, after we have once committed ourselves to them.

CHOICE OF COMPANY.

Associate with men of good quality, if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone, than in bad company.

DIFFIDENCE.

Submit your sentiments with diffidence. A dictatorial style, though it may carry conviction, is always accompanied with disgust.

THE GOLDEN RULE.

It is a maxim with me, not to ask what, under similar circumstances, I would not grant.

DEVOTION TO THE PEOPLE.

There is nothing I have more at heart, than to discharge the great duties incumbent on me, with the strictest attention to the ease and convenience of the people.

NATIONAL, DISTINGUISHED FROM PERSONAL, HOSTILITY.

I was opposed to the policy of Great Britain, and became an enemy of her measures; but I always distinguished between a cause and individuals. And while the latter supported their opinions, upon liberal and generous grounds, personally I never could be an enemy to them.

DIFFERENCE OF OPINION, NO CRIME.

Men's minds are as variant as their faces.

Where the motives of their actions are pure, the operation of the former is no more to be imputed to them as a crime, than the appearance of the latter; for both, being the work of nature, are alike unavoidable.

A difference of opinion on political points, is not to be imputed to freemen, as a fault. It is to be presumed, that they are all actuated by an equally laudable and sacred regard for the liberties of their country.

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