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" In the execution of such a plan, nothing is more essential than that permanent inveterate antipathies against particular nations, and passionate attachments for others should be excluded ; and that, in place of them, just and amicable feelings towards... "
Maxims of Washington: Political, Social, Moral and Religious - Página 93
por George Washington - 1855 - 423 páginas
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Democracy, Equality, and Justice: John Adams, Adam Smith, and Political Economy

John E. Hill - 2007 - 290 páginas
...permanent enemies, only permanent interests. Washington argued that, in implementing our foreign policy, "nothing is more essential than that permanent, inveterate...and that in place of them just and amicable feelings toward all should be cultivated."81 Even Washington's great rule of conduct is cast in terms of the...
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Alexander Hamilton: America's Forgotten Founder

Joseph A. Murray - 2007 - 266 páginas
...Vol. 35, 218 - 219 36 Ibid, 230 justice tow(ar)ds all Nations. Cultivate peace and harmony with all. In the execution of such a plan nothing is more essential...Nations and passionate attachments for others should be excluded."37 He also said, Of all dispositions and habits, which lead to political prosperity, religion...
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The Public Diplomacy Reader

J. Michael Waller - 2007 - 524 páginas
...recommended by every sentiment which ennobles human nature. Alas! is it rendered impossible by its vices? 209 In the execution of such a plan, nothing is more essential...antipathies against particular nations, and passionate attachment for others, should be excluded; and that in place of them, just and amicable feelings towards...
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What Would the Founders Do?: Our Questions, Their Answers

Richard Brookhiser - 2007 - 272 páginas
...unnecessary ill-will, and the latter breeds favoritism. Both lead to a loss of judgment, and of self-control. "The nation, which indulges towards another an habitual...hatred, or an habitual fondness, is in some degree a slave"—a charged word for a slave owner to use. "It is a slave to its animosity or to its affection,...
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