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" Hence likewise they will avoid the necessity of those overgrown military establishments, which, under any form of government, are inauspicious to liberty, and which are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty. In this sense it is... "
An Essay on the Life of George Washington: Commander in Chief of the ... - Página 479
por Aaron Bancroft - 1807 - 2 páginas
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The American Way of Strategy: U.S. Foreign Policy and the American Way of Life

Michael Lind - 2006 - 304 páginas
...rival ships alone would be sufficient to produce, but which opposite foreign alliances, attachments, and intrigues would stimulate and embitter. Hence,...sense it is that your union ought to be considered as a main prop of your liberty, and that the love of the one ought to endear to you the preservation of...
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Florida: Leading the Transformation of American Politics

Max Linn - 2006 - 131 páginas
...interventionist foreign policy to which both parties now adhere. Consider Washington's words on foreign policy: "Avoid the necessity of those overgrown military establishments...regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty." This is no granola-crunching pacifist talking, but rather our first commander-in-chief, the dauntless...
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Union 1812: The Americans who Fought the Second War of Independence

A. J. Langguth - 2006 - 499 páginas
...copied it out himself. With unchallengeable authority, Washington took the occasion to warn against "the necessity of those overgrown military establishments,...form of government, are inauspicious to liberty." Love of their country was the Americans' best defense of that liberty. Political factions tended to...
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A Faustian Foreign Policy from Woodrow Wilson to George W. Bush: Dreams of ...

Joan Hoff - 2007
...warning against permanent political alliances. Also forgotten is Washington's admonition to the nation to "avoid the necessity of those overgrown military establishments...any form of government, are inauspicious to liberty. " Washington's notable statements in 1793 and 1796 perfectly reflected the vulnerable position that...
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Flagging Patriotism: Crises of Narcissism and Anti-Americanism

Robert Stam, Ella Shohat - 2007 - 408 páginas
...Washington warned against "overgrown military establishments which under any form of government [were] . . . inauspicious to liberty, and which are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty."28 James Madison, the primary author of the Constitution, wrote, Of all enemies to public...
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White House Ghosts: Presidents and Their Speechwriters

Robert Schlesinger - 2008 - 595 páginas
...than listeners. Washington warned against "foreign alliances, attachments, and intrigues"; against "the necessity of those overgrown military establishments,...regarded as particularly hostile to Republican Liberty"; against the party system; and in favor of the new federal government. During his presidency, from 1829...
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A Political Odyssey: The Rise of American Militarism and One Man's Fight to ...

Mike Gravel - 2011 - 296 páginas
...years later, Washington said in his parting speech that, to remain free and united, the country must "avoid the necessity of those overgrown military establishments...form of government, are inauspicious to liberty." He said such an establishment would be "particularly hostile to republican liberty." They were words,...
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